Archive for the 'Law' Category

Workers caught back-dating deals

New EFCL board unearths secret operation

By Darren Bahaw and Renuka Singh
November 14, 2015 –

CorruptionA secret contract millhouse was discovered at the Education Facilities Company Ltd (EFCL) in Maraval, and armed guards have been called in to secure a mountain of potentially damning evidence which points to the illegal manufacturing of backdated tender documents worth hundreds of millions of dollars.

The discovery was made one day after the new board of the state-owned company suspended its Chief Executive Officer Kiran Shah and Chief Operating Officer Sharma Maharaj over claims of impropriety.
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Therese Ho vs Lendl Simmons court ruling

Published: Trinidad Guardian
October 26, 2015 –

Sex EducationIn this claim the parties were engaged in a sexual relationship and during the course of same several photographs were taken by them, some of these photographs depicted the Claimant nude and two of the photographs depicted her engaged in fellatio with the Defendant (the photos). After their relationship ended some of the photos were allegedly shown to other persons and as a result the Claimant instituted the instant action and sought the following reliefs:
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Anand getting $$ from flawed children law— AG

By Radhica Sookraj
October 14, 2015 –

Anand RamloganFormer attorney general Anand Ramlogan is remaining tight-lipped about accusations he was profitting from civil lawsuits brought against the State because of flawed legislation passed by the People’s Partnership government.

The accusation was made during the budget debate on Monday by Attorney General Faris Al-Rawi in reference to the Children’s Community Residen­ces, Foster Care and Nurseries Act.
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UWI in Debe – 2 questions

October 08, 2015 –

University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad Main Administration BuildingTHE RECENT debate of the rights and wrongs of a new UWI law campus being built in Debe revealed some of the complexities of the business of education and unleashed an unusually high level of public discourse.

I use the word “business” advisedly.

I could also add the word “politics”. I pose two questions arising from the hornet’s nest uncovered by former UWI principal and President of Trinidad and Tobago George Maxwell Richards in his speech at the recent opening of the 2015-16 Law Term. Firstly, what are universities for? Secondly, do we need more lawyers? I share Professor Richards’ view that a university’s “…contribution depends substantially on the activities of its academics and students to discuss, evaluate, criticise and investigate ideas and thus make available to the policymakers and the community possible options.” I would add that universities are where people learn to develop their thinking and knowledge to an advanced level that will serve in the advancement of the human race in all its aspects.
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AG served with election petition at Mahabir’s funeral

By Vashtee Achibar
September 27, 2015 –

PNM vs UNCAttorney General Faris Al- Rawi, also the sitting Member of Parliament for the San Fernando West seat, was on Friday served with an election petition at the funeral service for former People’s National Movement (PNM) government minister Errol Mahabir.

The funeral service took place at the St Paul’s Anglican Church on Harris Promenade, San Fernando and was attended by hundreds of mourners including Prime Minister Dr Keith Rowley, former Prime Ministers Patrick Manning and Basdeo Panday, a line up of government ministers and senators as well as members of Parliament from both sides of the House and a list of other prominent persons in society.
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Lowest common denominator

By Raffique Shah
September 21, 2015

Raffique ShahLast week, at the opening of the new law term, two main speeches were delivered.

The first was a feature address by former President of the Republic and principal of the UWI St Augustine campus, Professor Max Richards. The second was the customary speech by the Chief Justice, a kind of state-of-the-Judiciary report which, I submit, is a veritable regurgitation of judicial woes that can be re-read year after year with only minor changes to the text.
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Shooting the messenger

Newsday Editorial
September 19, 2015 –

President Professor George Maxwell RichardsFORMER President George Maxwell Richards must be doing something right. With just one speech, he’s managed to upset all sides of the political divide.

Before he had even finished his remarks delivered at the religious service held to mark the opening of the Law Term on Wednesday, detractors wrongly speculated he had made an error; that his remarks were not intended for the occasion.
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It could cut both ways for UNC or PNM

September 15, 2015 –

PNM vs UNCA British-based attorney yesterday, said the Opposition United National Congress’ (UNC) election petition could cut both ways, as the ruling People’s National Movement (PNM) could claim it also lost votes due to the extension of voting time in the election held two Mondays ago.

Attorney Anand Beharrylal, who specialises in constituional law, however supported the UNC’s petition on the basis that the courts need to lay down the law on the powers of the Elections and Boundaries Commission (EBC) relating to extending the time for voting, without consulting political parties.
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Clarify property tax

Newsday Editorial
August 25 2015 –

HouseUNFORTUNATELY all of the barbs being exchanged in relation to the question of a proposed property tax have distracted us from the deeper question: what is the policy of both of the major parties on the imposition of taxes on property assets generally? The property tax was a proposal of the last PNM administration and it would have introduced a brand new regime of taxation which would be tied to the rental and taxable values of property.
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7-year-olds can be charged

By Alexander Bruzual
Monday, August 17, 2015 –

ViolenceWith two children, aged 11 and 13, currently before the courts on charges of manslaughter, several members of the public have taken to social media questioning at what age can a child be held criminally responsible for their actions, and if it was right that children be made to face such a serious charge.

However, many people may be shocked to know that the age for criminal responsibility in Trinidad and Tobago is actually seven years.
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