Tag Archive for 'Kwame Nantambu'

Hypocrisy towards violence in T&T

By Dr. Kwame Nantambu
April 26, 2014

Dr. Kwame NantambuOne of the most ridiculous and hypocritical political statements ever made in the history of public policy-making in this country is the remark by Prime Minister Kamla Persad-Bissessar that her Government “will look at legislation that can offer protection to children in their homes”.
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Decoding Crime in T&T

By Dr. Kwame Nantambu
February 12, 2014

Dr. Kwame NantambuOne of the apparently unknown realities of crime in T&T is the fact that neither the current People’s Partnership (PP) government, a People’s National Movement (PNM) government nor an Independent Liberal Party (ILP) government can solve/prevent certain crimes in this
country.

For example, if as occurred quite recently, an aggrieved ex-husband decides to kill his ex-wife, then, there is absolutely nothing any of the afore-mentioned or the Commissioner of Police can do to prevent/stop this familial crime.
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Jesus’ Birth: Afri-centric Analysis

By Dr. Kwame Nantambu
December 22, 2013

Dr. Kwame NantambuAs Trinbagonians gear up to celebrate the Christian religious event of Christmas, it is apropos to disseminate the historical, Afri-centric , real truth about the birth of Jesus.

Indeed, if one looks at the first three hundred years of Christianity, it is in many aspects, a derived African religion. As Dr. Yosef ben-Jochannan points out in his seminal magnum opus African Origins of the major “Western Religions” (1970):”within the three most accepted religions in Europe and the Americas- Judaism, Christianity and Islam, often called ‘Western Religions’, Africans have been the founders of said religions and their teachings ( had been known) in some cases thousands of years before they were known to the peoples of Europe.”
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Mandela: From Prisoner to President

By Dr. Kwame Nantambu
December 10, 2013

Dr. Kwame NantambuNow that 95-year old Nelson Mandela has died, it is indeed a glorious sine qua non to trace/recount/relive his remarkable/heroic journey from prisoner/revolutionary to President of South Africa.

At the outset, it must be emphasized that the year 1994 was a pivotal, watershed turning-point as the white minority-ruled South Africa joined the civilized nations as a de jure actor on the international stage of democracy.
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Why Jack Warner-ILP Lost

By Dr. Kwame Nantambu
October 23, 2013

Dr. Kwame NantambuThe paucity of votes (62,000) Jack Warner’s Independent Liberal Party (ILP) mustered at the 21 October 2013 local government elections sent a very loud and clear signal/message to the extent that the electorate wanted more than just fanfare, entertainment, elaborate promises and jerseys (money was good too).

Indeed, Uncle Jack must now ask himself these serious, ex post election introspective questions: Where did all my putative green supporters go and did not do, according to plan, on election day?; Were the pre- election day numbers a mere illusion of popular support?; Did my putative green supporters just went with the green flow/ride with no previous intention of so voting?—”Is party time.”
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Kamla not ready for prime time

By Dr. Kwame Nantambu
October 17, 2013

Dr. Kwame NantambuThe decision by Prime Minister Kamla Persad-Bissessar not to participate in the Trinidad and Tobago Debates Commission’s (TTDC) leaders’ debate on 15 October 2013 speaks volumes as to her overt, detrimental/self-destructive tit-for-tat myopic politics.
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One Laughable Political Moment

By Dr. Kwame Nantambu
August 20, 2013

Dr. Kwame NantambuOne of the most laughable and incredulous moments in Trinidad and Tobago’s political history was the public yellow balloon, albeit ploy, by Prime Minister Kamla Persad-Bissessar that certain “councillors” at a national executive meeting of the United National Congress (UNC) urged her to postpone constitutionally-scheduled local government elections.
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Law versus the race question in America

By Dr. Kwame Nantambu
July 25, 2013

Dr. Kwame NantambuThe “not guilty” verdict in the George Zimmerman case brings to the fore the twin-headed problem that confronts America today, namely, law versus the race question.

At the outset, it must be stated quite equivocally that the race question was intrinsically rooted in the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s and it also played a pivotal role in the passage of the Voting Rights Act signed by then President Lyndon Baines Johnson on 21 March 1965.
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Mandela: From Prisoner to President

By Dr. Kwame Nantambu
June 17, 2013

Dr. Kwame NantambuAs Nelson Mandela remains “in critical condition” in a hospital in Pretoria, South Africa, as a result of “a recurring lung infection” it becomes extremely imperative/vital to trace/recount his remarkable/heroic journey from prisoner/revolutionary to President of South Africa.

At the outset, it must be emphasized that the year 1994 was a watershed turning-point as the white minority-ruled South Africa joined the civilized nations as a de jure actor on the international stage of democracy.

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Indian Indentureship: Afri-centric Analysis

By Dr. Kwame Nantambu
May 29, 2013

Dr. Kwame NantambuThe purpose of this article is to conduct an Afri-centric, linkage analysis of the Indian Indentureship system.

In his magnum opus titled Capitalism & Slavery (1944), Dr. Eric Williams postulates that: “The immediate successor of the Amerindians was not the African but ‘poor whites’. They were regarded as ‘indentured servants’ because before leaving England, they had to sign a contract binding them to service for a stipulated period for their passage. Others were criminals/convicts who were sent by the British government to serve for a specific time on plantations in the Caribbean.” (p.9).
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